Do pedestal sinks hide plumbing?

Yes, they will cover up the plumbing that goes into the pedestal sink so you won’t have to worry about it being visible. In addition, you can request a drain opening in your tile before installation so that any plumbing leaks from your toilet or other appliances can simply pass through the floor tiles via a drainage route instead of seeping through the subfloor and causing damage.


Plumbing has a way of being very annoying and inconvenient, whether it’s clogged drains or water leaks, so hiding plumbing is an important consideration when you are planning a bathroom renovation. Because pedestal sinks have a large open area beneath them if it’s not properly waterproofed or sealed to prevent leaks, any plumbing that is installed underneath can be visible.


How do pedestal sinks hide plumbing?

The pedestal sink can make it look like no other fixture is even in the bathroom, and that’s because all of the pipework is hidden underneath the base of the sink rather than being exposed around the edge. This makes a pedestal sink ideal for small bathrooms where space is at a premium, as it maximizes available floor space.

A pedestal sink can make your small bathroom look larger and more spacious by removing bulky legs and casings and creating a freestanding sink that allows the rest of the room to breathe.

If you have a pedestal sink in your small bathroom, it can provide an easy solution for hiding plumbing, but only if it is properly designed and installed with this in mind. A pedestal faucet is typically not anchored to the floor, so it can be moved around easily if necessary. For this reason, you must install your pedestal sink on a reinforced structure that will support its weight and provide a suitable anchor point for your plumbing.


Pedestal sinks with Sealed Floor

A sealed floor underneath the pedestal sink is best because it will prevent any leaks from seeping through the floor and damaging the subfloor. This is especially important if you live in an area where it’s common to experience heavy rainfall.


Pedestal sinks with Tile Floor

When using tile as your bathroom flooring, you can install drain openings into the tile that will allow water to leave underneath your pedestal sink without affecting the subfloor. Then you can quickly mop up the water on the tile floor after using your pedestal sink without worrying about it getting wet or damaged.


Pedestal sinks with Sloped Floor

If you have a sloped bathroom floor, some of the water will naturally drain out from underneath your pedestal sink anyway, particularly if you use a pedestal faucet that has a pop-up drain. This similarity of slope between the tile floor and the bathroom floor is good because it allows water to drain down quickly, so you won’t have to worry about your pedestal sink flooding after use.


How much does it cost to purchase a pedestal sink?

Typically, pedestal sinks are very affordable and range in price from less than $100 up to about $500. The more expensive options tend to be made of higher quality materials or come with extra features like faucets made of brushed nickel rather than chrome plastic.


How much does installation cost?

The cost to have a plumber come out to install a pedestal sink can vary from as little as $75 up to about $200, usually depending on the location of your bathroom. In an average bathroom that’s already been renovated with all new fixtures and pipes, installing a pedestal sink will likely cost somewhere between $75 and $125.


Will a pedestal sink work with my existing plumbing?

A pedestal sink will not work properly if it is installed on top of an existing drainpipe, as the water pressure from the faucet will be greatly reduced and your toilet and bathtub may also experience poor drainage. The best way to check if your existing drain will work with a pedestal sink is to look at the installed pipe in your bathroom when it’s not in use and make sure you can’t see any leaks or seepage when you run the faucet.


Can I install my own pedestal sink?

Most people can install their pedestal sink without too much difficulty, but if you’re not very handy or don’t have a lot of experience in DIY home repair work it’s best to hire a plumber.


Do I have to use a wax ring?

Only when installing a new toilet on top of your existing pedestal sink, and only if the toilet flange is not directly in line with the base of your sink. If it is, you can use a special plastic gasket ring instead of a wax ring to make up the difference in height between the two fittings.


How much does it cost to remove a pedestal sink?

The cost will vary depending on where your bathroom is. The average cost for removing a pedestal sink is $75 to $125, but you should check with your plumber first before committing to having this work done.


What happens if I can see up through the drain of my pedestal sink?

If you’re able to see light or even an open hole up through the drain of your pedestal sink, then you’ll need to either repair the seal underneath the sink or call a plumber to fix it for you. This is because it could mean that there’s been damage done to your subfloor or even leaks from your plumbing system that has become stained onto the tile flooring.


How do I know how high or low to have my pedestal sink?

You should have your professional check the height. That being said, generally, you want your faucet to be about 36 inches from the floor so that it’s comfortable for people of all heights to use. In a space where only adults will be using the sink, it can go up another 12 inches or so.


How much does a pedestal sink weigh?

A typical cast iron pedestal sink can weigh as much as 220 pounds. This is because they’re usually made from cast iron instead of molded plastic, which means that they’re very sturdy and durable but may not be the best option for someone who isn’t very tall or has mobility issues.


What materials should I avoid putting down my pedestal sink?

Toilets and other large objects will usually only damage the drain, so it’s okay if they’re accidentally dropped into a sink. But other than that there isn’t much you should put down your pedestal sink that won’t clog up the drainage.


How long can a person stand in a pedestal sink?

A typical pedestal sink will have enough room for people to comfortably use the bathroom without bumping into the spout at all. While it’s not recommended that you sit down on top of a drain, it’s generally safe as long as there isn’t any leakage from the pipes.


Conclusion:

A pedestal faucet is typically not anchored to the floor, so it can be moved around easily if necessary. For this reason, it’s important that you install your pedestal sink on a reinforced structure that will support its weight and provide a suitable anchor point for your plumbing.

A sealed floor underneath the pedestal sink is best because it will prevent any leaks from seeping through the floor and damaging the subfloor. This is especially important if you live in an area where it’s common to experience heavy rainfall.

When using tile as your bathroom flooring, you can install drain openings into the tile that will allow water to leave underneath your pedestal sink without affecting the subfloor. Then you can quickly mop up the water on the tile floor after using your pedestal sink without worrying about it getting wet or damaged.

If you have a sloped bathroom floor, some of the water will naturally drain out from underneath your pedestal sink anyway, particularly if you use a pedestal faucet that has a pop-up drain.

This similarity of slope between the tile floor and the bathroom floor is good because it allows water to drain down quickly, so you won’t have to worry about your pedestal sink flooding after use.

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Thomas

Thomas

My blog about renovating a bathroom. I started this blog to share with people what I found in my research and to give suggestions for bathrooms.

About Me

This blog is all about Pedestal Sinks. I am a plumber, and this site is my personal blog. I found myself with some spare time on my hands, so I decided to start writing about the things that have been occupying my head lately: plumbing projects and tips for people who are doing their own home renovations.

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